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State Advisory Council on Libraries - Information of Interest


Libraries and Transliteracy This blog is a group effort to share information about the all literacies (digital literacy, media literacy, information literacy, visual literacy, 21st century literacies, transliteracies and more) with special focus on all libraries.

This topic is important to all types of libraries so we have authors from public, university, college and school libraries for a broad perspective.


BTOP Grant Executive Summary Communities throughout Nebraska face a significant gap in access to adequate broadband Internet and computer services. For example, a large number of low income citizens cannot afford home broadband adoption and a high population of senior citizens does not understand the importance of these technologies. This lack of reliable Internet and computer access prevents these people and others from benefitting from valuable job search and job skills training, educational opportunities, crucial e-government information and high-quality health information.


Checking out the Future In the 21st century, the digital revolution shows no signs of slowing. To remain relevant, any institution, including one as established as libraries, must evaluate its place in a world increasingly lived online. The good news is that many library professionals recognize this need and are driving adaptations designed to ensure that libraries remain an integral part of our society's commitment to education, equity, and access to information.


Museums, Libraries, and 21st Century Skills the following pages outline a vision for the role of libraries and museums in the national dialogue around learning and 21st century skills; this report also includes case studies of innovative audience engagement and 21st century skills practices from across the country.


Opportunity for All: How the American Public Benefits from Internet Access at U.S. Libraries. This study provides the first large-scale investigation of the ways library patrons use this service, why they use it, and how it affects their lives. A national telephone survey, nearly 45,000 online surveys at public libraries, and hundreds of interviews reveal the central role modern libraries play in a digital society.


There's an App for That! The adoption of mobile technology alters the traditional relationships between libraries and their users and introduces novel challenges to reader privacy. At the same time, the proliferation of mobile devices and services raises issues of access to information in the digital age, including content ownership and licensing, digital rights management, and accessibility. This policy brief explores some of these issues, and is intended to stimulate further community discussion and policy analysis.


The American Library Association is the oldest and largest library association in the world, with more than 65,000 members. Its mission is to promote the highest quality library and information services and public access to information. ALA offers professional services and publications to members and nonmembers, including online news stories.


The Institute of Museum and Library Services mission is to create strong libraries and museums that connect people to information and ideas.


Nebraska Libraries Future Search

Since Nebraska Libraries Future Search was a topic of our last meeting, I thought you might be interested in this wiki. Particularly, Rod Wagner has highlighted this report (found under Readings section): "Perceptions of Idaho's Digital Natives on Public Library Services." Much of this report relates nicely to our themes of assessment, marketing and customer service.

I think p. 49 and the perception of libraries including "strict old women with sticks" is particularly interesting.

Have a look. This may make for good discussion at our next meeting!


Nebraska Memories Nebraska Memories is a cooperative project to digitize Nebraska-related historical and cultural heritage materials and make them available to researchers of all ages via the Internet. Nebraska Memories is brought to you by the Nebraska Library Commission.

The Nebraska Memories database houses digital collections created by Nebraska libraries and cultural heritage institutions such as museums and historical societies. Primary source materials such as manuscripts, diaries, photographs, sheet music, maps and oral histories are being targeted for inclusion.


History of the Nebraska Library Commission and Nebraska Libraries The Nebraska Public Library Commission was established by an act of the Legislature on March 27, 1901, and the office of the Commission was opened in the State Capitol on November 11 of that year. The Commission was charged to "encourage the establishment of libraries where none existed and the improvement of those already established."

Nebraska has a long tradition of library service, beginning with military post libraries, continuing with literary society libraries founded during Territorial times, women's club libraries, Carnegie libraries, college and school libraries, and the modern libraries of today. The Nebraska Library Commission Archives, houses materials about the history and operations of the Nebraska libraries it has served since the agency's creation in 1901. The collection includes Commission biennial and annual reports, newsletters, documents, photographs and artifacts.


WebJunction is an online community where library staff meet to share ideas, solve problems, take online courses - and have fun.


Geek the Library is an online community that hopes to inspire a conversation about our incredible public libraries and their urgent need for increased support. We hope you tell people what you geek, how the public library supports you and your community, and that everyone in your community benefits from the services your local library provides.


Library Training and Events Calendar the place to find out what programs or workshops are being offered in Nebraska libraries or library organizations.


For more information, contact Jennifer Wrampe.